The fall down – Part 2

20 06 2021

Almost a couple of years ago, I wrote an autobiographical post on an abuser priest I had the misfortune of knowing. I kept the names and details fairly anonymous because no one had ever come forward openly as a victim. Well, that changed recently, and I just found out about it. I know everyone that Mrs. Victoria McQuade is talking about in the video above, in fact, I knew Victoria herself by sight fairly well, and saw her every day. I also know the friend she refers to, or at least I have a pretty clear idea of who it is. From her testimony, the now defrocked priest, Benedict “Ben” Vanderputten, had been grooming her and harassing her for years, as well as perhaps a dozen other young women. I highly encourage everyone to watch to her interview, both to know the full scope of the Society of St. Pius X’s cover-up for their ex-priest’s crimes, as well as an amazing testament to keeping one’s faith in an almost impossible situation.

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On religious exclusivism

21 12 2020

I have been asked / goaded into responding to the latest two hour interview with David Bentley Hart. I really would rather not, but as this particular interview was hosted by a fellow Hare Krishna devotee, I feel that I must clear up certain misrepresentations of Krishna consciousness. I am submitting this to the unconvinced or third parties who may have gotten the wrong impression of Gaudiya Vaishnavism and Hart’s position in contemporary Christian discourse.

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The morality of voting

29 10 2020

I have a hard time accepting that there is any spiritual, ethical, or moral dimension to voting in a mass democracy. To state otherwise seems to be invoking the proverbial butterfly that flaps its wings and causes a hurricane on the other side of the world.

If you’re going to impute moral credit or culpability for one vote in the midst of millions, you have to be precise about it. If I vote for the “wrong” candidate and am thus worthy of Hell because of it, what degree of fault do I have for the sins of my favored candidate? How many babies did my vote in particular abort? How many migrant children did my vote in particular put in cages? How many foreign people did my vote in particular kill in unjust wars? And so on. If we are going to use moral and juridical language, if we are going to assign fault, we have to quantify it. Or if I back into someone in a parking lot, am I somehow worthy of the death penalty because the trauma of the accident subtracts so many seconds from the person’s life?

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Arguments Against Universalism: A Personal Encounter — The Chequer-board of Nights and Days

20 06 2019

Back here I discussed two forms of argument against universalism, both of which I considered to be red herrings–that is, arguments that don’t actually address the issue at hand. The first argument boiled down to saying, “Don’t worry about the fate of others–worry about yourself. Your main goal is to keep yourself from going to […]

via Arguments Against Universalism: A Personal Encounter — The Chequer-board of Nights and Days





On Kołakowski and the Neoplatonic Pre-History of Marxism — Daniel Tutt

12 06 2019

With increasing interest in new forms of Marxism, the philosophical origins of Marx’s thought have been a topic of important debate with many studies locating Marx’s early thought in Christian theology. The early Marx often reads like a quasi-theologian when he discusses ideas of universality and the emancipation of the proletariat. But does Marx’s early […]

via On Kołakowski and the Neoplatonic Pre-History of Marxism — Daniel Tutt





Līlā; or, It’s Just a Ride

29 05 2019

The Chequer-board of Nights and Days

One of the perennial questions of religion is raised by the existence of evil.  The world, as anyone with eyes to see, is a rough-and-tumble place, a place where huge amounts of extremely nasty things occur.  In and of itself, this obvious fact is, while unpleasant, also unremarkable.  For a non-believer, the evil in the cosmos just is.  There’s  no particular reason for it, any more than there is for any other observed phenomenon.  The universe is a quirk of random chance, and it is as it is, a mixture of good and bad.  Much of the badness, in fact, is a function not of any cosmic principle, but of our perspective as humans.  Disease, suffering, and death are very much meaningful–and unpleasant–to us, since they affect us in ways we don’t at all like.  For the disease-causing pathogens that live on us, though, we’re a veritable smorgasbord…

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More from the Mailbox

22 05 2019

I was re-reading this the other day and thought I would share it again.

Reditus

A continuation of a previous conversation:

Of course the liturgy of the Byzantine Church is infinitely better than the Latin Church. Why do you think I had anything to do with it? Just because I “liked it” or that it made me “feel closer to God!” There are many reasons for why it is better.

The Latin Church has always been rather primitive. It tends far more towards the “mystical” and direct “feeling” approach because it is so far behind the eight ball when it comes to brains. They (Latins) never really got into the big theological debates of the first 7 councils. They have always promoted a Jesus-centric, (not even Christo-centric) spirituality. They have never really come to terms with the role of the Mother of God. All the major liturgical feasts of the BVM were imported from the East and the Reformation never had a clue what it…

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The only way to win is not to play

8 05 2019

The idea of reviving the office of female deacon or deaconess has been raised by the current Vatican. Though I have traditionalist leanings, I don’t have a strong opinion on this. To cite Slavoj Zizek, I would say that I would prefer not to, but I don’t think the traditional camp has much of a leg to stand on at this point. Deaconesses are documented to have been in existence in the early Church, and across various ritual churches, their duties and privileges varied widely. Apparently in the Armenian Orthodox Church, there were female deacons all the way up to the middle of the 20th century and beyond. Above is a recently ordained Armenian female deacon. What would the Vatican or conservative Catholics say about this deacon? What if the Armenian Catholics, who share the same rites but are communion with the Vatican, decide to ordain their own female deacons again? Could she serve in St. Peter’s Basilica during Mass, as clergy in other rites sometimes tend to do? I would say this is not a question of “if”, but “when”. Read the rest of this entry »





On the Power of the Stars

6 05 2019

Reditus

fortunaAnd some random reflections

[Image by Robert Place found on this site]

But what is remarkable about the Florentine cupolas is that they represent no merely random arrangement of the stars: the artist has preserved the aspect of the sky exactly as it appeared at a given day and hour. Why was this done? Without the slightest doubt, because some event of decisive importance for the Church had taken place at that very moment – an event over which the celestial powers then above the horizon had presided. Aby Warburg was able, in fact, to prove that the arrangement of the stars shown in the Old Sacristy of San Lorenzo corresponds exactly to their position in the sky above Florence on July 9, 1422, the date of the consecration of the main altar.

-taken from The Survival of the Pagan Gods by Jean Seznec

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On the love of God

5 04 2019

Reditus

A spiritual creature can love God more than himself because the relation of a creature to God is the relation of the part to the whole. A part can love the whole on which it depends for its existence more than it loves itself. The hand moves instinctively to sacrifice itself in protecting the body whose part it is. The citizen willingly gives up his life for the community of which he is a member. So the creature can love the God on whom he depends even more than he loves himself- more so indeed than the hand or citizen in the examples cited. For the creature’s relation to God is no ordinary relation of part to whole. It is a relation of participation, the relation of a participant to the Infinite Existence in whose plenitude it shares. The creature depends on God for everything he is and does. God…

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