On Pascal

13 07 2019

Again, the problem is not simply things as they are but, unlike the body/matter-loving Christians of the 20th/21st century, things are bad. For God had created this age to be an imperfect one of growth and transfiguration. There’s a typological parallel between Eve birthed from sleeping Adam’s side and the dead Christ’s pierced side pouring out blood and water, the elements of His bride, the Church. The difference in types truly shows how horrifying sin truly is, and what the curse had contained through a brutal regime of hard-work, suffering in life-giving, and mortality cut off from immortality. But more importantly, God had chosen to hide Himself in a peculiar form. Why not simply make things perfect? And once fallen, why not just fix it? Christ created rational creatures that He draws into the most peculiar relationship. All of heaven and earth sing of their Creator, but the Creator shrouds Himself in darkness. He speaks, but in riddles. The creation bears this mark, the sign of wisdom, but wisdom now crucified. There is a difference between programming and self-discovery. The latter does not mean, or require, a human autonomy in contrast or in differentiation from divine providence. Man plans in his heart, but God directs his footsteps. Advocates of free-will like to contrast God’s creation of humans, as rational and willful creatures, not robots. So far, that’s basically true, but that is totally irrelevant if God is accountable for the salvation of these creatures. Those who use these arguments to argue for a powerless God who can’t stop or intervene in affairs know nothing of the Bible. In Scripture, humans are simultaneously open and free, while never outside God’s will. Luther’s deterministic pessimism, bordering on the manichean, is as equally delusional as the Jesuit’s Molinistic optimism in Human rationality and the integrity of creation.

The rest here.