Additional thoughts on Wojtyla’s theology of the body

18 05 2009

casamiento

After writing my essay on the theology of the body last week, some lingering ideas have been on my mind. I add them here as an appendix to what I originally wrote.

The main reason for the vehemence behind the former post is due to a sense that the theology of the body threatens to invert the ethos of Catholicism in particular and Christianity in general. Indeed, the weakest link in John Paul II’s catechesis is when he has to deal with the various passages in the New Testament where Our Lord and Saint Paul discuss the role of celibacy in the Christian mystery. While he by no means dismisses these passages, he does not quite know where to fit them into his ideological construct. John Paul II seems to want to stand the Christian vision on its head: the paradigm on which Christian discourse must be based is that of the intimate relationship between man and woman. Since we are discussing an “ethos” and not necessarily an idea, it is not possible to come up with a specific proof text to prove Wojtyla wrong. If he and others want to see the Christian mystery through the prism of marriage, that is their prerogative. It can be one school among many, but I would contend that it is not the correct one.
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Realized Eschatology – Part II

18 05 2009

dinoscopus1

The Return of the Bishop

Not quite. He never really went away. From his exile in disgrace outside of London, Bishop Richard Williamson of the Society of St. Pius X continues to write down his thoughts for the world’s consumption. Due to this medium called the Internet, he is able to keep us informed of what he is thinking, and I would suspect that the hype has died down enough that few people are really concerned about his ideas. Being an alumnus of one of his former seminaries, I try to stop by his blog once in a while. What he wrote most recently, however, brought back some keen Lefebvrist memories of why I was once involved with them in the first place.
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