More notes on method

6 11 2008

450px-saint_expedit_petit_serre_dsc03555

Taken from my comment on the Sarx blog:

…I think what most determines “tradition” is what we bring to the table. I think the greatest revelation about the SSPX is that they are fetishizing some very “traditional” things in very idealistic, totalitarian ways. The same goes with the Orthodox when they approach modernity, as well as with more conservative Catholics. In the end, the picture that is created is a totalizing one that leaves aside and cuts out much of the story, if you will. Certain things don’t “fit” in their vision and are simply ignored, or worse, persecuted.

I would thus say that “tradition” is something that is not ideal; it is something that simply works. It is not determined by ideology precisely because it is not ideal; it is religion with all of the blemishes, it is Faith as it has to be. I would like to say that the attack on tradition started with the Protestant Reformation, but Catholicism since then has also treated this tendency as an enemy within; the old villain of lay “superstition”.

In the end, the first principle that I start with is that the most certain starting point is tradition as it has been passed down to you immediately by those who preceded you. It is a foolish errand to try to figure out how the “first Christians” thought or acted; for all we know, they could have been a bunch of fornicating magicians who used the name of Jesus to put curses on people (there is some evidence that this was the case in some places). You can’t determine belief by archeology. In the end, you have to go with what has been put into your own hot little hands, tempered a bit by reason. I emphasize, however, “a bit”.


Actions

Information

5 responses

17 01 2015
Anonymous

Ur crying for a female there r more women out there

15 08 2012
Jose chavez

please pray that Claudia Sabina lopez return to me I love my ex very much an miss our family we blended together

7 11 2008
random Orthodox chick

I was just thinking about this last night, actually.

Mushy or not, I love the Orthodox Church very very much. This would explain when I get prickly when fellow Orthodox try to turn her into something she is not: a totalitarian state, fearful, alienating, and with a “shape up or ship out” mentality. It does not resonate with the true freedom I’ve found in Her, nor does it agree with Her role in my life as the lifeline to our merciful God.

Sometimes I still sound like I’m on the honeymoon, I think 😛

Good points overall. I’ve read the points before, I just really like the way you’ve articulated it here.

7 11 2008
triunepieces

for all we know, they could have been a bunch of fornicating magicians…

I can’t get David Copperfield in a miter out of my mind.

6 11 2008
Christopher Orr

An interesting way of making a good point. I would tend to add to that little ‘bit’ of reason two things: a humble, concerted attempt to try and do only and all that you received as well as the humility to understand that perhaps your spiritual forebears, fathers and mothers were wrong. This latter can lead to conversion away from the faith of one’s fathers/mothers, but it is also necessary for simple repentance and a conversion to true faith. Of course, it is also easy to set oneself above faith in pride and to attempt a ‘cleansing’ of that which was never dirty, e.g., Nestorius’ know better attitude regarding the Mary and contra the lex orandi.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s




%d bloggers like this: