Oración a Santa Elena de Jerusalén

30 01 2009

santa-elena

Gloriosa Santa Elena, gloriosa Santa Elena, gloriosa Santa Elena, hija de la reina de Jerusalén; a Jerusalén fuiste, tres clavos trajiste, uno trajiste, lo consagraste y el martes a la mar lo echastes; el otro se lo diste a tu hermano Cipriano, para que venciera en guerra y batalla; y ese que te queda en las benditas manos no te lo pido dado, sino prestado, para enterrárselo en los sentidos a (aquí el nombre de la persona) para que no me olvide; para enterrárselo en la frente a (aquí el nombre de la persona), para que me tenga presente; para enterrárselo en el corazón: San Caralampio, tráemelo, Santa Elena, el clavo que te pido es para que me tenga presente y enterrárselo en el pensamiento; que venga Santa Elena, no le dejes en cama acostar, ni con mujer alguna conversar; como perro rabioso que vuelva a buscarme; Santo Varón, te pido para que nunca me olvide por otra mujer; Jesús Nazareno, tráemelo; Santa Bárbara, que (aquí el nombre de la persona) no me olvide. San Antonio, que (aquí el nombre de la persona) me cumpla lo que me ha ofrecido; San Juan Bautista, santo antes de haber nacido, concédeme lo que te pido, que (aquí el nombre de la persona) me cumpla por la santa camisa que te pusieron hoy; San Miguel, písalo; San Cipriano, óyeme y préstame lo que te pido; Elena, conmuévele el corazón con esa varita que tienes contigo, milagrosa Santa Elena, traémelo. -5 Padre Nuestros, 5 Ave Marías.

Glorious St. Helen, glorious St. Helen, glorious St, Helen, daughter of the queen of Jerusalem. You brought three nails, one you brought, you consecrated and threw it into the sea on Tuesday; the second you gave to your brother Cyprian to conquer in battle and war; and the one that is still in your holy hands I ask to borrow and not to be given, to nail it into the senses of (name) so that he doesn’t forget me; to bury it in his forehead so that he always has me before him; and pierce it through his heart; St. Caralampius, bring him to me; St. Helen, the nail I ask you for is to nail it in his thoughts so that he is always thinking of me; may St. Helen come, may he not be able to lie down in a bed or converse with another woman; as a rabid dog may he come to look for me; Saint Varon, I ask that he never forget me for another woman; Jesus Nazarene, bring him to me; St. Barbara, may (name) never forget me; Saint Anthony, may (name) keep the promise that he made me; Saint John the Baptist, saint before you were born, may he keep his promise by the holy shirt they have put on you today; St. Michael, step on him; St. Cyprian, hear me and lend me all that I ask; Helen, move his heart with that wand that you have with you; St. Helen, bring him to me. -Pray 5 Our Fathers and 5 Hail Marys

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35 responses

30 01 2009
The Shepherd

This sounds like a curse, wait I guess it is a curse.

30 01 2009
Arturo Vasquez

No, it is a binding prayer. That means it is a love spell. These types of spells are generally used by women to attract a husband, though now it is used to bring wayward husbands back to their families. Santa Muerte in Mexico is often used by many curanderos to do this now, though originally St. Helen was the big saint for this, as you can see by this prayer. The Red Santa Muerte is sort of a transformed St. Helen.

30 01 2009
The Shepherd

Okay, that makes more sense. One thing I am curious about is whether certain prayers or Saints are more “effective” than others. Also does the state of the one saying the prayer make a difference in its power?

p.s
I also decided to take a peek at that curandero mailing list. These men and women seem to lead very interesting lives.

30 01 2009
Ben George

It doesn’t sound like a curse really… I wish people would return to St Helen of Christ rather than Red Santa Muerte.

St Helen, daughter of the king of Jerusalem, nail this “Santa” Muerte to the ground; St Michael slay it; Jesus Christ Harrower of Hell and Conqueror of Death, overcome the Muerte that has gripped your people, bring them from Muerte to new Life for your name’s sake.

30 01 2009
Arturo Vasquez

Santa Muerte ain’t so bad. It’s a dirty job, but some angel has to do it.

30 01 2009
random Orthodox chick

I read one of your recent book recommendations, and I have to say this aspect of Mexican folk Catholicism was very interesting to me. Just like the beloved breast-plate prayer of St. Patrick (I mean the real “I bind to myself today” one), it seemed so real. More real than the “Oh, I’ll just divorce his/her cheating ***” mentality.

30 01 2009
Ben George

I don’t think that any angel would pull the Body of Christ apart into sects like Santa Muerte’s Iglesia Católica Tradicionalista.

Our Mother Mary! Put this skull faced wraith in the pit! St Michael, lock her up!

30 01 2009
Arturo Vasquez

It’s funny, really. In actual Catholic tradition, St. Michael is the angel of death. That is why he is often portrayed with scales.

31 01 2009
Ben George

“In actual Catholic tradition, St. Michael is the angel of death.”

Hm… that makes sense, seeing as how he casts things into hell…

All the more reason for him to smash the power of Santa Muerte, the usurper of his prerogatives.

10 03 2011
Anonymous

St Michael is not the angel of death rather he is the protector of the church and of house holds. He is also the patron saint of the armed forces and policemen

31 01 2009
Arturo Vasquez

Ben George,

Okay, there are certain things about the cult to Santa Muerte I don’t like, and as I have written, it now seems to resemble more Cuban Santeria than folk Catholicism. But your categorizing of all followers of Santa Muerte as closet Satanists is something that is unacceptable in my eyes. My grandmother had a statue of her, and she didn’t defile any Hosts. So cut the BS already.

I get it, I get it: you hang out with Mexicans and you want to evangelize them with your stale form of correct gringo Catholicism. That’s nice, but realize that what you see as so “correct” only reflects the prejudices of the hierarchy which happen to gel well with what an Anglo would find “acceptable”. Well, let me tell you, if we went back to the Middle Ages, you would see that those poor superstitious kids who pray to Jesus Malverde would have had a faith more similar to the average peasant than your well-trained fellow catechists. And as for the accusation that these are all “criminal cults”, you and I well know that these figures have wider devotion than just criminals. Guilt by association doesn’t work here.

I am no romanticist, nor do I think the people can “guide” themselves in the faith without pastors. However, those pastors in my view have done a pretty royal job of mucking things up, and often throw the folk Catholic baby out with the superstitious bath water. So I would think twice before slamming la Pelona too harshly. And to tell the truth, if you post anymore crypto-pious stuff on my blog, I am just going to delete it. You’ve hit too close to home on this one.

31 01 2009
The Shepherd

I HAVE a rendezvous with Death
At some disputed barricade,
When Spring comes back with rustling shade
And apple-blossoms fill the air—
I have a rendezvous with Death
When Spring brings back blue days and fair.

It may be he shall take my hand
And lead me into his dark land
And close my eyes and quench my breath—
It may be I shall pass him still.
I have a rendezvous with Death
On some scarred slope of battered hill,
When Spring comes round again this year
And the first meadow-flowers appear.

God knows ’twere better to be deep
Pillowed in silk and scented down,
Where love throbs out in blissful sleep,
Pulse nigh to pulse, and breath to breath,
Where hushed awakenings are dear…
But I’ve a rendezvous with Death
At midnight in some flaming town,
When Spring trips north again this year,
And I to my pledged word am true,
I shall not fail that rendezvous.
~Alan Seeger

31 01 2009
M.J. Ernst-Sandoval

It’s funny, really. In actual Catholic tradition, St. Michael is the angel of death. That is why he is often portrayed with scales.

Actually, he’s the saint to pray to for the Holy Souls in Purgatory. After my grandmother died earlier this month, I blew out the St. Jospeh votive candle (he’s the patron of the dying) and replaced it with one of St. Michael.

1 02 2009
christina

With respect, where did Ben George say that the followers of Santa Muerte are “closet Satanists”? Granted, he believes that Santa Muerte is a false god and therefore a demon (perhaps based on 1 Corinthians 10:91-22) That doesn’t make the worshipers of false gods into “closet Satanists,” it just means they are sincerely wrong.

Granted, your grandmother had an image of “holy Death” on her altar, but do you know absolutely for certain that she actually prayed to la Santisima Muerte in the same way these modern devotees do? Could it be that the statue served only as a momento mori? Keeping a figure of the Grim Reaper before her eyes may have been a way to remind herself of the fleeting nature of life. Do you know for sure what significance the image had for her?

Also, isn’t it true that not all Mexicans like Santa Muerte? She’s hardly an essential part of Mexican Catholic popular culture, more of a fringe figure and rather controversial even south of the border. So condemning her need not be a sign of a racist attitude toward Mexicans or Mexican devotion in general, just an objection to this one particular devotion.

I could certainly be wrong, of course. But from the looks of it, a certain reader comes along to a blog, prays that the Saints will crush a modern devotion to a certain fringe folk figure that many people find disturbing and terrifying, and the blogmaster accuses him of being a racist who thinks his beloved deceased grandmother desecrated Hosts in a satanic ritual. Forgive me, but isn’t that condemnation just a tad extreme? (Unless of course you have some other reason to make that charge, of course, perhaps some knowledge of this reader of which I am unaware. If so, I apologize.)

1 02 2009
Arturo Vasquez

Christina,

For the record, my mother says that my grandmother used to pray to Santa Muerte. It is very likely that she did not see her as the vast majority of people in the contemporary cult that currently is manifesting itself in Mexico. Then again, they don’t have a monopoly on her. As evidenced by the drawings of Jose Guadalupe Posada, there has existed for a long time the figure of la Catrina or Dona Sebastiana. There is a shrine in the state of Oaxaca devoted to el Senor de la Muerte, and there is another image in central Mexico of an image going back to the eighteenth century. There is even a Filipino version of this figure as seen in this link.

It is very much the case that this cult has grown farther and farther away from the limits of even unorthodox folk Catholicism. As I have shown, a lot of this has to do more with the increased secularization of society than with some spontaneous explosion of crypto-Satanism. I have studied this question quite a bit and continue to study it, and I have admittedly evolved on this question. What I will not accept are blanket accusations or caricatures of a very complex phenomenon. I have been in these botanicas, and I can plainly see that a lot of this is the result of evil forces mascarading as an angel of light, as you have insinuated. However, the iconoclasm of contemporary modern Catholicism is also such a manifestation, and arguably a far more nefarious one. But I don’t see anyone throwing the same accusation around when talking about this, for questionable reasons.

In any event, I am the “blogmaster”, and unfortunately my exhortation still stands. I do not think that Ben George is a racist at all, but at the same time I have very little patience for those who think the answers here are cut and dry. I think in this time, all of us have to go through a profound discernment as to what the nature of real religion is. If anyone wants to make straw men and take one’s frustration out on them, he or she is welcome to do it. Just not here.

2 02 2009
Ben George

“I get it, I get it: you hang out with Mexicans and you want to evangelize them with your stale form of correct gringo Catholicism.”

No, I am fine with curandera and even what a lot of folk would call white magic. Sacramentals, statues, novenas, parades, all of it is great. I have re-thought my stance on Jesus Malverde since our last interaction, when kids ask me I tell them about how he repented and allowed his friend to bring him in for the ransom.

I just think it’s very obvious that a lot of Santa Muerte devotion doesn’t have to do with Christ. I’m not really sure what I did to make you call me a racist, or that I’m BSing and crypto-pious.

Sorry to offend. I genuinely enjoy your blog. I don’t know what you have against me except that I’m white and that I’m suspicious of Santa Muerte.

18 03 2009
Anonymous

what do i do with the statue do i keep it in a drawer under my bed or do i burry it somewhere

18 03 2009
Arturo Vasquez

What statue?

18 03 2009
Anonymous

i was doing the seven not tie and they told me to do this pray so i did and no i dnt no what to do with the statue

18 03 2009
Anonymous

the santa muerta statue

18 03 2009
Arturo Vasquez

Dude, are you Mexican? If not, you shouldn’t be messing with this stuff.

Most of the “Santa Muerte” statue rules are pretty much made up in the last ten years. Sometimes, people say that you need to put an apple here or a candle there, or that you shouldn’t put Santa Muerte on the same altar as St. Cyprian or St. Martin of Tours since they don’t get along. My grandmother’s Santa Muerte was just a black skeleton that was on an altar with Juan Soldado. Otherwise, a lot of this stuff is about as traditional as New Age crystal “magic”.

Me, I consider myself a devout Catholic, so I don’t mess around with this stuff. People generally say that if you get in with the Pelona, you are playing with fire. But in any case, you should direct your question here if you really want to know.

18 03 2009
Anonymous

i have the red santa muerta and a red ribbon tied in seven nots with my boyfriends semien like is said to do and to say this prayer that was on this page but it didnt say what to do with the statue i am mexican but i dnt no if im suppose to burry it it didnt say I just want to keep him with me always so i was told to do a seven tied knott on the bottom of her did i do something wrong

18 03 2009
Anonymous

i had a bad marriage i was abused but i had 6 kids then he hit them so i divoced him then i started to see this guy well he ended up seeing my daughter behind my back i found out and left him then i found this one and hes good to me but im scared im going to lose him so i did this 7 tied not on the red santa muerta with his seimen i just dnt no what to do with it a lot of people say they burry it at there front door to draw him to stay and be faithful im just scared help me please

18 03 2009
Arturo Vasquez

Like I said, you should really go on the Curanderismo Mailing List and ask your question there. As far as I know, you never bury a Santa Muerte statue. The only reason you would bury a saint is to punish him/her for not granting your petition. In essence, that is what the famous St. Joseph house selling incantation is all about. There are many, many other cases of statues and pictures of saints being buried, submerged in the ocean, or turned upside down when a petition isn’t granted. It happened in my family as well.

Really though, I would most of all pray to God and to St. Anne to get you a good man in your life (presuming that you weren’t married to your first husband in the Church, in which case you are stuck). You should also start going to Mass every Sunday, going to Confession, and praying the rosary. By all means you should storm heaven with your prayers, and even in the Gospel Our Lord talks about being insistent. But in the end, God ain’t your sugar daddy. You have to resign yourself to the will of God. I would try a novena, to St. Ann if you can, or even the above prayer to St. Helen. I cannot recommend Santa Muerte totally, since, to tell the truth, I really don’t know if she exists. I mean, what is she, anyway? An angel? A spirit? I don’t know.

Let me know if this helps.

19 10 2010
Anonymous

How long does this prayer. Generally take to see some kind officer changes and for how long do you have to do it

10 09 2009
ANGELICA ROMAN

Yes, i was wondering how these Saints are Connected to Jerusalem and the tribes of Israel ? Also , Is is true that Mexicans and Colombians are part of the tweleve tribes that you know of ? Third is praying to saints for power over someone considered VooDoo Or Witchcraft to your knowledge ?

Thanx , Blessings

4 12 2009
zuenity

what is the petion to this prayer,is there anything else involved..

6 12 2009
anna

Gloriosa Santa Elena, gloriosa Santa Elena, gloriosa Santa Elena, hija de la reina de Jerusalén; a Jerusalén fuiste, tres clavos trajiste, uno trajiste, lo consagraste y el martes a la mar lo echastes; el otro se lo diste a tu hermano Cipriano, para que venciera en guerra y batalla; y ese que te queda en las benditas manos no te lo pido dado, sino prestado, para enterrárselo en los sentidos a (aquí el nombre de la persona) para que no me olvide; para enterrárselo en la frente a (aquí el nombre de la persona), para que me tenga presente; para enterrárselo en el corazón: San Caralampio, tráemelo, Santa Elena, el clavo que te pido es para que me tenga presente y enterrárselo en el pensamiento; que venga Santa Elena, no le dejes en cama acostar, ni con mujer alguna conversar; como perro rabioso que vuelva a buscarme; Santo Varón, te pido para que nunca me olvide por otra mujer; Jesús Nazareno, tráemelo; Santa Bárbara, que (aquí el nombre de la persona) no me olvide. San Antonio, que (aquí el nombre de la persona) me cumpla lo que me ha ofrecido; San Juan Bautista, santo antes de haber nacido, concédeme lo que te pido, que (aquí el nombre de la persona) me cumpla por la santa camisa que te pusieron hoy; San Miguel, písalo; San Cipriano, óyeme y préstame lo que te pido; Elena, conmuévele el corazón con esa varita que tienes contigo, milagrosa Santa Elena, traémelo. -5 Padre Nuestros, 5 Ave Marías.

12 02 2010
angela

yo quiero saber si san helen le pides y se cumple

6 03 2010
tere

santa helena por por amor a dios haz que regrese a mi jp

9 03 2010
Elaine

“The Red Santa Muerte is sort of a transformed St. Helen.” From what I understnad, Santa Muerte was 1) an ancient Aztec goddess, whose spouse, the God of Death, was unfaithful to her, and she killed him. 2) her spouse was unfaithful and she committed suicide, God saw hre suffering and returned her as the Patron of Marriages. For any reason, she is seen as the protector of any and all couples, married or not. The oracion is very much wrapped in Catholism and being raised by a Catholic step dad, I know there is much to the prayers to the Saints and Angels. The Bible is full of incantations, if you know how to interpret them. Devout faith and belief is all that is required to have your requests granted, not that you be Mexican. I am Anglo Saxon, and have had Saint Anthony, Saint Jude, Saint Martha, and Jesus himself to come to my assistance over the years. I do not see the Santa Muerte any more “frightening” shall we say than any other saint, not to mention Most Holy God himself, who requires true devotion. So long as you aren’t seeking assistnace from a fallen angel or evil spirit, I believe the person’s own faith and prayers determine their outcome. Blessings to all :~)

15 03 2010
la fresita

yo creo en santa elena y en todos los santos buenos♥

4 11 2010
Patty

Gracias a santa Elena le tengo mucha fe y se q me esta cumpliendo lo q le pido amen

30 11 2010
Anonymous

how long do u need to do this prayer for in order for this to come true?

9 03 2011
eliett

Creo en santa Elena ella es poderosa.




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